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Spicer.pdf

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Web page for Memories of a Miner by Dr. Michael Ruth

Mine deaths

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Memories of a Miner by Dr. Michael Ruth

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These coins are about the only thing that remains I’ll these companies
Their crimes against working people or numerous and it is fitting that the only things remaining do you script tokens or tokens of their shame.
The rails have been removed the temples torn down the row houses moldered away and little remains

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Movies

BMC v appleman right of way

https://www.courtlistener.com/opinion/3458291/black-mountain-corporation-v-appleman/?

The appellant Black Mountain Corporation owns extensive coal lands in Harlan county, and in 1918 it constructed a mining camp on Yocum creek. This mining camp is now known as Kenvir and has a population of approximately 2,500. It is unincorporated, and the Black Mountain Corporation owns substantially all the real property in and around the town. When the camp was established, streets and roads were laid out; but these are the private property of the Black Mountain Corporation and are used by the public only with its permission. Yocum creek, which is 40 to 60 feet in width, runs through the town in a westerly direction.

We argue about the past, hoping to understand the future. And it works. Humans do the same kinds of thing over and over, so if we see how they behaved in the past we will know something about their capacity. We know for sure that they will tolerate slavery for thousands of years

 

 

so if we find a way some exploit others, maybe we can stop them. Or to take a liberal position, to slow them down. Or a conservative

The Harlan Daily Enterprise story of September 16, 1943 is serious and straightforward: 17 miners are trapped a mile underground and help is on the way.

 

Much of the story is about help. Five men and their titles are listed and all are doing all they can.

The officials were listed were the "veteran safety director of the Harlan Coal Operators Association, and Rufus Bailey and H. Hamlin, state district inspectors of the State Department of Mines and Minerals, rescue squads rushed their drive to the blasted area, identified as having occured in No. 12 left section.

George S. Ward, secretary of the Harlan County Coal Operators Association, who was keeping in close touch with the rescue work.

Moss Patterson, Lexington, chief of the State Department of Mines and Minerals, was reported enroute to Harlan County to lend a hand in the rescue work.

pectors of the State Department of Mines and Minerals, rescue squads rushed their drive to the blasted area, identified as having occured in No. 12 left section.

There is no context. Why do such explosions occur? How often do coal mines explode? How can they be prevented?

Day Bros. feud

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