top of page

Kenvir is about three miles from Virginia and is named for the initial letters of Kentucky and Virginia. It's unlikely that anyone who lived there would have thought of that–the road ends at Punkin Center, a cluster of twenty or so houses and the way to Virginia from there is straight up Cumberland Mountain. But sitting up in Chicago looking at a map, somebody thought that was a fine idea and so Kenvir became the town name.

"The appellant Black Mountain Corporation owns extensive coal lands in Harlan county, and in 1918 it constructed a mining camp on Yocum Creek. This mining camp is now known as Kenvir and has a population of approximately 2,500. It is unincorporated, and the Black Mountain Corporation owns substantially all the real property

in and around the town. When the camp was established, streets and roads were laid out; but these are the private property of the Black Mountain Corporation and are used by the public only with its permission."

Black Mountain Corp. v. Appleman, 33 S.W.2d 327 (Ky. Ct. App. 1930)

Kenvir is about three miles from Virginia and is named for the initial letters of Kentucky and Virginia. 

IMG_2839.jpeg
IMG_2839.jpeg
IMG_2839.jpeg

Scatter tags are small pieces of aluminum foil or paper that are mixed in with coal to brand it. Black Mountain used red heart-shaped foil and the scatter tags and the heart-shaped cut-out on its scrip refer to the name of its mine, the Great Heart mine.

Coal from the Great Heart mine was used by Adm. Byrd in Antartica for his 1939 exploration. He's expedition was cut short by the outbreak of the war and he left a large amount behind.

bottom of page